Synchronous Hole Recognition in Solid Edge

Spotting cyclindrical cutouts in history-free imported models using Solid Edge ST5.

Comments Off on Synchronous Hole Recognition in Solid Edge June 20, 2013
by John Pearson, DesignFusion

If you are using the synchronous modeling in Solid Edge ST5 you may have noticed the new Recognize Hole command found under the Hole Command flyout.

This command, specifically designed for imported models with no history, enables cylindrical cutouts to be automatically identified and re-defined as synchronous procedural hole features. It is available in the Part, Sheet Metal and Assembly environment. The user simply has to select the command and select the model. Holes are automatically recognized and displayed in the Hole Recognition dialog.

Hole types and sizes are grouped together automatically.

A user can choose not to recognize a cylindrical feature as a hole by toggling off the check mark for the feature.

Within the dialog, you can rename the hole features, by double clicking on the default feature name. You can also redefine the hole feature, by applying saved settings or by using the hole options dialog.

Once the user selects OK, to accept the hole options change, a preview of the new hole parameters is shown on the model. The user then selects OK, in the Hole Recognition dialog, to accept the change.

The user can use the Face Selection option to recognize holes only on selected faces.

Pre-selection of a face, or faces, is also supported. You can select a face, or faces, and then run the Recognize Holes command, to perform recognition on only the selected face(s).

The Hole Recognition command allows users to add intelligent synchronous procedural hole features to imported models. Because it’s a hole feature, it also recognizes the user defined pattern created in all hole features, which can be used for rapid placement of bolts or screws in the assembly.

John Pearson is a Senior Technical Trainer and Application Specialist at Designfusion. He has over 24 years’ experience in the CAD/CAM industry, is a Certified Adult Trainer and has taught evening CAD courses at colleges in Ontario. He is also a major contributor of articles on the Design Fusion blog.